3 Shrubs To Plant For Survival

If you are designing a bug out location, survival retreat or homestead where you can weather the coming storm; you might want to plant these 3 unique, productive, perennial shrubs.

Bayberry

bayberryThe Bayberry is a very interesting shrub. It’s height varies from 2 to 12 ft, depending on variety and location. It prefers acid soil and has roots that fix nitrogen, allowing it to grow in poor soil. The bayberry, or candleberry, has long been an important plant in the new world and cultivated by our agrarian ancestors.

Survival Uses…

Bayberries are an excellent source of candle wax. It has been called the “candle berry” and the “tallow shrub”. Candles made from bayberry wax are prized because they burn slow and don’t melt or slump in the summer heat. Bayberry fruit produces about 1 lb of wax for every 15 lbs of berries, so if you are interested in planting them for wax production it would be a good idea to plant a number of them.

The fragrant leaves can be used as an insect repellent

Roots can be prepared as a treatment for diarrhea and dysentery.

If you would like more information on growing and using Bayberries you can check out the entire plant profile, including a tutorial on rendering the wax At This Link

Elderberry

elder-693931_640The American Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis), has long been a standard homestead shrub and was used extensively by American Indian tribes for many different things. Elderberries can grow anywhere from 9 to 15 ft tall and prefers moist, well-drained, sunny sites, but also can grow in dry soils. It is a dominant understory species in riparian woodlands. The shrub is known to do well in hedgerows.

Survival Uses…

Elderberries are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants, and has very high immune boosting properties. It has been long considered one of the best treatments for the flu.

Both ripe berries and flowers can be used for food and the berries make an excellent wine.

Elderberry shrubs are fast growing and make an excellent “edible hedge”, wind break or concealment screen.

Indian used elderberry twigs and fruit in creating dyes for basketry.

Elderberry branches can be used to make arrow shafts.

Whistles can be constructed by boring holes into stems.

The pith of the stem can be removed and used as tinder for starting fires.

Hollowed out stems can be used as spiles (spouts) for tapping sugar maple trees.

You can find more in depth information on growing and using Elderberry At This Link

Siberian Pea Shrub

siberian-peashrub-plant-profile-1024x102411The Siberian Peashrub is a tall bush that can reach heights of 6 to 19 ft. The plant has thorns, and is hardy to -40 F, prefers full sun, and can tolerate dry conditions well. It is native to Asia and eastern Europe and has been used for food, fiber, and dye by people in that region for centuries. It is a legume that fixes nitrogen in the soil, a pioneer plant and a producer of large numbers of seed pods.

Survival Uses…

Peashrub seeds are 23% protein, contain 12% fatty oils, and make an excellent chicken feed. History records that Siberian peasant farmers during WW2 overwintered their laying flocks on peashrub seeds when they were cut off from outside supplies.

Peashrubs have many thorns and can be planted as a defensive fence or hedge that will slow down and discourage invaders.

The fiber from the peashrub stalks can be used to make a strong cordage

Russians used to make a blue dye from peashrubs

You can find additional information HERE


Save

Save

Save

Scott M Terry
Follow Me

Scott M Terry

Scott Terry is farmer, survivalist, political activist and writer who lives in the backwoods of the northeastern United States.You can sign up for the Backwoods Resistance Newsletter HERE and find him on Facebook HERE

Republishing Policy

Permission is granted to publish my articles on other websites under these conditions.

Article must be copied in FULL, leaving all links intact and a link to the original article.

You must include the above author bio with a link back to this website
Scott M Terry
Follow Me

Latest posts by Scott M Terry (see all)

Scott M Terry

Scott Terry is farmer, survivalist, political activist and writer who lives in the backwoods of the northeastern United States. You can sign up for the Backwoods Resistance Newsletter HERE and find him on Facebook HERE Republishing Policy Permission is granted to publish my articles on other websites under these conditions. Article must be copied in FULL, leaving all links intact and a link to the original article. You must include the above author bio with a link back to this website

2 thoughts on “3 Shrubs To Plant For Survival

  • November 27, 2016 at 8:37 pm
    Permalink

    Scott, Do bayberries grow in your area. Do you know if they can survive in the south?

    Reply
    • November 27, 2016 at 11:49 pm
      Permalink

      Hi Judy!

      We don’t have any wild ones on the farm but they do grow throughout new england. They also grow in the south, the southern variety is called Myrica gale if my memory serves correctly. I think that the southern varieties are much better for wax production than Myrica pensylvanica.

      Hope you and David are doing well

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *